Production Performances of Indigenous Buffaloes int the Western Hills of Nepal

  • B. S. Shrestha Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Lumle, Kaski
  • N. Amatya Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Lumle, Kaski
  • R. M. Singh Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Lumle, Kaski
  • P K. Jha Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Lumle, Kaski
  • B. R. Acharya Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Lumle, Kaski
  • K. B. Gurung Regional Agricultural Research Station, Nepal Agriculture Research Council, Lumle, Kaski

Abstract

A study was carried out in the western hills to identify the production potential of indigenous buffaloes in order to develop breeding strategy for genetic improvement in Nepal. Production and reproduction performances of indigenous buffaloes were monitored in eight different sites of western hills during 2001-2003. The morning and evening milk production of indigenous buffaloes were recorded with five days of calving for the first time and subsequently at monthly interval. Reproductive performance was calculated based on the farmers' response on the buffaloes under recording. The standard 305 days lactation yield (Least Square Means) of Lime and Parkote buffaloes were 962 lit and 1022 lit respectively which was statistically non sigrdicant. The average yeilds of buffaloes at different locations were highly significant (P=0.000). The least square means of lactation yield of buffaloes at Simichaur-Gulmi was the highest (1429 lit) followed by buffaloes at Argali-Palpa (1142 litj and Risingpatan -Tanahun (1068 lit). The buffaloes at Baughapokhari, Palpa were found to have the lowest (805 lit.) standard 305 days lactation yield. There was great variability in the lactation performance of indigenous buffaloes ranging from 300 to 2300lit. The age at first calving, calving interval and calving to mating intervals in Lime and Parkote buffaloes were 4.56 year, 600 days, 198 days and 4.48 years, 604 days and 213 days respectively. The production records have clearly iridicated the possibility for improvement in indigenous buffaloes through selection. This implies that selective breedmg for genetic improvement would be the supplementary option to the present cross breedng strategy with imported Murrah bulls or its frozen semen particularly for remote hills of Nepal.